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Episode 43 – Hot Mustard Maidens

In this episode, we attempt to purchase firewood, make room bookings, report on Mustard happenings, and try to solve who the fairest Mustard Maiden is.

Features calls by Miriam, Akspa, Dwight the Janitor, LilDTB, Wingless, Snappybakes, DaDead, Milkman, and Clementine.

This episode was recorded June 26th 2020.

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HotMustard

Hot Mustard

hot mustard
Traditional Japanese Hot Mustard

Karashi (芥子, 辛子, からし, or カラシ) is a type of mustard used as a condiment or as a seasoning in Japanese cuisineKarashi is made from the crushed seeds of Brassica juncea and is usually sold in either powder or paste form. Karashi in powder form is prepared by mixing with lukewarm water to a paste and leaving it covered for a few minutes.[1]

Karashi is often served with tonkatsuodennattō, and shumai.[2] It can be used as part of a dipping sauce when mixed with mayonnaise, called karashi mayonnaise or with vinegar and miso, called karashi su miso.[3]

It is also used to make pickled Japanese eggplant, called karashi-nasu.[4]

One of Kumamoto‘s best-known meibutsu is karashi renkonlotus root stuffed with karashi-flavoured miso, deep fried, and served in slices.

Hot Mustard 1
Categories
Mustard

Mustard

Mustard 2
Traditional Spicy Brown Mustard

Mustard is a condiment made from the seeds of a mustard plant (white/yellow mustard, Sinapis alba; brown mustard, Brassica juncea; or black mustard, Brassica nigra).

The whole, ground, cracked, or bruised mustard seeds are mixed with water, vinegar, lemon juice, wine, or other liquids, salt, and often other flavorings and spices, to create a paste or sauce ranging in color from bright yellow to dark brown. The taste of mustard ranges from sweet to spicy.[1]

Commonly paired with meats and cheeses, mustard is also added to sandwicheshamburgerscorn dogs, and hot dogs. It is also used as an ingredient in many dressingsglazessaucessoups, and marinades. As a cream or as individual seeds, mustard is used as a condiment in the cuisine of India and Bangladesh, the Mediterraneannorthern and southeastern EuropeAsia, the Americas, and Africa,[2] making it one of the most popular and widely used spices and condiments in the world.[3]